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"It's nothing more than an irrelevant piece of evidence," he told District Court Judge Richard Ball, who sustained Dakmak's motion and barred the evidence from being admitted.William Rollstin, an assistant attorney general, argued that the simple facts made the evidence relevant."What the evidence shows is that Dean Strampel set up a hidden camera in his office so that he could look out into the anteroom and view individuals, and there are still photographs we're ready to provide the court as exhibits of young ladies walking past his office."Ball allowed the AG's Office to admit 19 images and some videos found on Strampel's work computer as evidence.The photos, which were shown to the courtroom filled with media, attorneys and members of the public, were of bare vaginas, nude and semi-nude women, sex toys and pornography.Some of them were viewed online and saved to the browser's history, and others were sent through email or saved to the computer.

John Dakmak, Strampel's attorney, said the decision wasn't a surprise."There's much more to come," he told a group of reporters after the hearing.

Criminal Division Lead Trial Attorney Bill Rollstin of the Attorney General's Office listens as John Dakmak, the attorney for William Strampel makes his closing arguments Tuesday, June 5, 2018, in 54B District Court.

Strampel faces four criminal charges, including a felony and two misdemeanors related to the 2014 Title IX investigation of Larry Nassar.

Criminal Division Lead Trial Attorney Bill Rollstin of the AG's Office looks over his glasses during the preliminary hearing for former MSU dean William Strampel in 54B District Court Tuesday, June 5, 2018, in East Lansing.

Former MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine dean William Strampel, left, talks with his attorney John Dakmak Tuesday, June 5, 2018, in 54B District Court.He faces four criminal charges, including a felony and two misdemeanors related to the 2014 Title IX investigation of Larry Nassar.Criminal Division Lead Trial Attorney Bill Rollstin, right, of the Attorney General's Office, makes an objection in 54A District Court Judge Richard Ball's courtroom Tuesday, June 5, 2018, as John Dakmak, attorney for former MSU dean William Strampel waits to respond.That video, found on a hard drive on Strampel's personal computer, was an hour and three minutes long and included images of female students walking by his office.